If you date a job, one day there will be a break up.

Angela ended the conversation with “You’re going to write about this, right?”
My response “Well I am now. But I’ll change the names to protect the innocent.”

What were we talking about? Angela had decided it was time to quit her job, and understandably she was nervous about the conversation with her boss. So nervous that she hadn’t slept much the night before, hence the quick coaching session the following morning.

What was making it hard for Angela was this wasn’t the “I quit!” type situation. Her boss wasn’t being a jerk, the work wasn’t terrible, she loved the company, and she adored her team. She knew, however, that what the company needed and what she had to give weren’t in alignment. It had been that way for a while, and it was time.

We’d talked before about how to approach the conversation. The following is what Angela asked I share with you.

It’s time to be practical but practical from the other person’s perspective. You’re about to mess with someone’s world, so put yourself in her shoes.

We tend to think (or not sleep) a ton about the emotional reaction of the person we’re breaking up with. How will they react? Will they get mad? No one wants an emotional or angry response. I often find the best thing to do is to pretend you’re the person hearing the news. What questions might they have? What are their next steps going to be? What might worry them? Continue reading “If you date a job, one day there will be a break up.”