Being Authentic: “The only thing you have to offer is you.”

The only thing you have to offer is you. … If it’s truthful to who you are and you’re concerned how people are going to react to it, stick up your middle finger and charge into that fire. You have to. If you’re trying to be a provocateur just to be a provocateur go f* yourself. That’s the bad stuff; it’s not real.

The quote was Darren Aronofsky’s response to the question on The Tim Ferriss Show: What advice would you give a filmmaker who doesn’t fit into the widget factory of movie making?

I pulled over my car to note the time on the podcast. I knew that I had to capture his words to include in this blog. His advice applies to you. It’s that important.

Your Human Value Proposition outlines why you matter, what you are known for. There are four things I listen for in your Human Value Proposition:

  1. Is it bold?
  2. Is it compelling?
  3. Is it unique?
  4. Is it authentic?

Aronofsky’s advice speaks clearly to the need authenticity, for being your real self. It also points out the real fear of being judged for that authenticity. Continue reading “Being Authentic: “The only thing you have to offer is you.””

Replicate Others’ Success or Craft Your Own Path

“How would you describe your approach to your craft, your program?”

I was led to answer this question when I told a friend that I was taking a Master Class from Steve Martin. I was gushing about how he thinks about the whole performance of comedy. Seriously, if you have any interest at all, check it out. I honestly enjoyed the class. Bonus: it was Steve Martin.

There was, of course, a ton of fascinating information on everything from how he crafted his personas to editing each and every single joke with a preciseness that only comes from being the perfectionist and craftsman he is.

What piqued my interest, and something I wanted to share was his discussion about trends and leaning into new ones, or even creating one yourself.

Steve reminisced about what a working, successful comedian looked and sounded like when he was first breaking into the industry. Most other comics dressed in jeans and leather jackets sporting long beards and shaggy hair. It was the late 60’s and early 70’s; I’m sure you get the picture.

He realized he should be different. He needed to be unique to be seen. In his class, he discussed the importance of “looking for the vacuum” rather than being like everyone else. Continue reading “Replicate Others’ Success or Craft Your Own Path”